In the 1930’s waist-lines returned and hems dropped back to the floor for eveningwear. And, undergarments virtually disappeared from under bias cut dresses featuring low cowl necklines, body skimming lines, and plunging backs. Weather you were long and lean or curvy from head to toe, these created a sexy, yet elegant silhouette that remained popular throughout the 1930’s.

What is the bias? It is the direction of a piece of woven fabric that is at 45 degrees to its warp (lengthwise threads that are held in tension on a frame or loom) and weft threads (thread which is drawn through the warp threads to create cloth.) So, if a fabric is woven, it has a bias. Cutting fabric along the bias creates elasticity and fluidity, perfect for the elegant, flowing, form skimming gowns popular in the 1930’s. According to the Voguepedia bias-cut styles of the 1930’s had their origins a decade earlier, when the Parisian couturier Madeleine Vionnetbegan experimenting with this tricky line. Cecil Beaton said, “Women dressed by her were like moving sculptures.” The Voguepedia also points out that the bias cut goes as far back as the Middle Ages, when men’s linen and wool hosiery was cut on the bias for better fit. But, as anyone who has watched Jean Harlow or Carole Lombard grace the silver screen knows, the bias cut’s highest form is in the elegant, and oh so glamorous satin evening gowns of the 1930’s.
JULIE FISHELL as Amanda

JEFFREY BLAIR CORNELL as Elyot and KRISTEN MENGELKOCH as Sibyl

JEFFREY BLAIR CORNELL as Elyot and JULIE FISHELL as Amanda